Actor Alec Baldwin, left, and actress Tina Fey hold their awards for their work in "30 Rock", at the 66th Annual Golden Globes Awards in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., on Sunday, Jan. 11, 2009. Photographer: Francis Specker/Bloomberg News
Actor Alec Baldwin, left, and actress Tina Fey hold their awards for their work in "30 Rock", at the 66th Annual Golden Globes Awards in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., on Sunday, Jan. 11, 2009. Photographer: Francis Specker/Bloomberg News

Alec Baldwin to Portray Brooklyn Prosecutor

It’s many lawyers’ dream to have a Hollywood script based on them. But it’s hard to think of many lawyers who have achieved such a fantasy.

Today, we have news reports that Alec Baldwin is set to portray the controversial Brooklyn prosecutor Michael Vecchione in a new TV series adapted from the lawyer’s 2015 book, Crooked Brooklyn.

The New York Post’s Page Six reports that the TV deal is “in development,” according to an interview with Jerry Schmetterer, who co-wrote Crooked Brooklyn with Vecchione.

Vecchione was a top deputy of former Brooklyn District Attorney Charles J. Hynes and he retired from the office at the end of 2013, just before Hynes was replaced by former federal prosecutor Kenneth Thompson.

The TV series will be based on Crooked Brooklyn, which chronicled the biggest cases from Vecchione’s career, including two cops who had a side career as mafia hitmen, and corrupt judges. His legacy as a prosecutor is tarnished by the fact that his conviction of Jabbar Collins for murder, who spent nearly 16 years behind bars, was overturned and it was at least partially blamed on Vecchione. Pro Publica published an investigative story on the case here.

Big Law Business reached out to Schmetterer and an attempt to reach Vecchione was unsuccessful, but we’ll update this post if we hear back. So far, Deadline and Page Six have the details: Baldwin is an executive producer along with Jason Egenberg and Brendan Deenan.

Certainly the TV series doesn’t sound like an inspiring Erin Brokovich-esq tale, which highlighted the work of Tom Girardi’s firm Girardi & Keese, in forcing Pacific Gas and Electric Company to pay victims of water contamination in the small town of Hinkley, Calif. in a $333 million settlement.

Some of the best lawyer films — To Kill a Mockingbird, A Few Good Men, and My Cousin Vinny — don’t count as biopics because they’re fictional. Have a favorite film about a real life lawyer? Send us an email at BigLawBusiness@bna.com.

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