Tag Archives: Law Schools

NY Bar Exam at the Javits Center

Are Law Schools with Low Bar Pass Rates at Risk of Closing?  

Are Law Schools with Low Bar Pass Rates at Risk of Closing?  

The University of La Verne College of Law enrolls over 100 students each year, and if past history is any indication, only slightly more than half, 54 percent, will likely pass the bar on their first try after graduation. Should that affect whether it stays open? The disconnect between a school’s low bar passage rate, relative to other schools in the

(Pixabay)

Whittier Law School Closing: The First of Many?

The Whittier College Board of Trustees announced Wednesday that it is closing its law school, making it one of, if not the first ABA accredited law school to shut its doors. But it likely won’t be the last, legal experts predict. “Once somebody does it, it becomes much more acceptable, psychologically and politically,” said Paul Campos, a professor

Harvard Law School. Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images

Are Top College Grads Starting to Think About Law School Again?

Has the law school so-called “brain drain” stopped? It’s been well-documented that the graduates of elite universities are applying to law school in smaller numbers. But a recent look at 11 elite colleges by Keith Lee of the legal blog Associate’s Mind suggests that law schools’ worst days could be coming to an end. In an

Photo by Unsplash (Pixabay)

Half of Law Firms Made Fewer Summer Associate Offers, Report Finds

Competition for entry-level Big Law jobs was fierce last summer, but new data suggests recruiting may have peaked. For the first time in four years, more than half (51 percent) of the law firms that responded to a National Association of Law Placement survey said they had made fewer summer associate offers than in the previous year.

Harvard Law School. Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images

Law School Rankings Still Drive Scholarship Awards (Perspective)

Editor’s Note: The author is a law professor who clerked for Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sandra Day O’Connor. By Deborah Jones Merritt, John Deaver Drinko/Baker & Hostetler Chair in Law, Ohio State Moritz College of Law It’s an open secret in legal education: Law schools substantially discount tuition for selected students. Classmates sitting side by

A general view of the Charlotte, North Carolina skyline.  (Photo by Craig Jones/Getty Images)

Will This Law School Close After Feds Cut Funding? (Perspective)

Charlotte School of Law may be on the brink of closure, which, as I have argued, would be the just result for a school that continues to exploit students. On Monday, the U.S. Department of Education announced it will end Charlotte School of Law’s access to federal student financial aid, also known as Title IV funds.

The Student Movement House in Russell Square, London, in 1933, a social centre founded in memory of students who died in World War I. At the time this photo was taken, students representing 57 nationalities used it. (Photo by A. R. Coster/Topical Press Agency/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

How to Attack the Legal Profession’s Diversity Problem (Perspective)

Editor’s Note: The author is a law professor who clerked for Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sandra Day O’Connor. By Deborah Jones Merritt, John Deaver Drinko/Baker & Hostetler Chair in Law, Ohio State Moritz College of Law This month the ABA’s Council, which bears responsibility for accrediting law schools, will consider a proposal to tighten the

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

Protest Planned for Scalia Law School Ceremony

Next week, George Mason University is planning to host an opening ceremony for the newly renamed Antonin Scalia Law School, and some unhappy students plan to be on hand to protest. The name change — from George Mason University School of Law to Antonin Scalia Law School — was announced in March and was done at the behest of an anonymous donor who

(Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

America’s ‘First Law School’

A nice find over at Law.com: It’s America’s first law school, at least according to its sign in rural Litchfield, Connecticut. The story is perfectly timely, as the class of 2019 strolls on campuses across the country: little do many know that they have this 232-year-old law school to thank. Called The Litchfield Law School, the school educated

Photographer: SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg

The Juris Masters Program: Natural Evolution or Stop-Gap for Struggling Law Schools?

It’s not a secret anymore: an increasingly popular way for law schools to boost revenues amid falling JD application numbers is to get students in the door for a masters program. But while the master of laws degree, or LLM, has long been popular for tax experts or foreign students, a more recent innovation — a

Top